Severed Light – Crossing the Void

Ecopsychology Project

The greatest lie we have been told upon entering the living world is that we, as humans, evolved beyond nature – as if we have risen above it, as if this is our progress and greatness as a species. This lie, however, has brought our human development to a halt and left us stranded, like a beam of light cut off from its source, illuminating only a sliver of who and what we are, creating a void of darkness all around us in which we are too afraid to approach. And if it approaches us, we cower in fear or lash out in aggression.
By psychologically viewing ourselves as better and superior to the assumed primitive lesser world of nature, is to deny and deprive ourselves of our own self – to separate our body from its natural evolution.
Human’s greatest gift is to “see” we are all the same, but it is also our greatest weapon, to “see” we are separate and alone in a void. Which have you chosen?
Are you ready to cross the void?

 

 

 

 

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The Difference Between Being Different and Being Divided. 

Ecopsychology Project


The Ecopsychological project “is simply to assert that our humanity is incomplete until we have established our kinship or social relations with the larger natural world and so satisfied our longing to feel at home in or at peace with the cosmos as a whole.” ~ Andy Fisher Radical Ecopsychology. Our relationship, as humans, with Nature is a differentiated relationship, rather than split. This understanding can be achieved by embodying an understanding not solely from a culturally mediated and historically changing world, but also by the greater world that’s claims us from both below and outside of human history: Nature itself. 

Ecopsychology then becomes a project in which, through this acceptance of our relational ties with nature, we discover how to maneuver our dialogue and communication into a direction that opens and returns us to a connection to the universe beyond the human realm. This process is ultimately the continuing progression of the human psychological development, rather than a halted closed-circuit development stuck in a perpetual isolated cycle of “domination over nature, escapism in the abstract, or existential funk.”

#wetooarenature #ecopsychology #communion #breakingthecycle #beyondculture #thecosmos #humannature

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The Ecopsychological project "is simply to assert that our humanity is incomplete until we have established our kinship or social relations with the larger natural world and so satisfied our longing to feel at home in or at peace with the cosmos as a whole." ~ Andy Fisher Radical Ecopsychology. Our relationship, as humans, with Nature is a differentiated relationship, rather than split. This understanding can be achieved by embodying an understanding not solely from a culturally mediated and historically changing world, but also by the greater world that's claims us from both below and outside of human history: Nature itself. Ecopsychology then becomes a project in which, through this acceptance of our relational ties with nature, we discover how to maneuver our dialogue and communication into a direction that opens and returns us to a connection to the universe beyond the human realm. This process is ultimately the continuing progression of the human psychological development, rather than a halted closed-circuit development stuck in a perpetual isolated cycle of "domination over nature, escapism in the abstract, or existential funk." #wetooarenature #ecopsychology #communion #breakingthecycle #beyondculture #thecosmos #humannature

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The Unconscious

Ecopsychology Project

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The Unconscious: "Is all those parts of experience that remained inchoate and unarticulated, parts for which we never developed a full voice, for want of that receptive intersubjective field that is requisite, for the full development of the self. It is experience that is felt but cannot be shared, represented, articulated, echoed, symbolized, and thus integrated into the whole social field this tends to become stunted and arrested at best, if it doesn't disappear from felt reality altogether." ~ ' The Voice of Shame, Gordon Wheeler Ecopsychology is always attempting to understand phenomena as experiential, or rather through the phenomenological experience: that how we come to understand our world, ourselves, and each other is an embodied experience. Ecopsychology's purpose is to extinguish the separation of self and nature and see it all as one whole process. So as a bodily sense of experience: what then is the unconscious? It is the body's stopped processes, a muscular and physiological blockage. It is a jam of our world-bound energies or intentions. We learn to deliberately intercept our bodily intentions (mainly through shame) until this becomes habitual: falling out of our explicit awareness. Thus the unconscious is born: our urges and desires (intentions) persisting in a cramped or dammed up form – as bodily blocked sexuality, anger, grief, fear, terror, love, joy, etc… Spoken in another way, if our body is a river then the water is our soul, and the movement of the water down river is the experience of life: our soul's awakening and expressed self. If you place a dam along the river, stopping the flow, jamming the experiential process of your water, then we have what we call the unconscious. The unconscious is not a separate mind within the mind. It is not this thing deep down inside of you with all the answers to the universe. It is not the "dam" itself, rather, it is a relational interactive phenomenon born from repression of your life process: not living fully. This is how pathology comes to exist. This is why the unconscious has become so common in psychology language to explain a part of ourselves. #theunconscious #wetooarenature #ecopsychology

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The Unconscious: “Is all those parts of experience that remained inchoate and unarticulated, parts for which we never developed a full voice, for want of that receptive intersubjective field that is requisite, for the full development of the self. It is experience that is felt but cannot be shared, represented, articulated, echoed, symbolized, and thus integrated into the whole social field this tends to become stunted and arrested at best, if it doesn’t disappear from felt reality altogether.” ~ ‘ The Voice of Shame, Gordon Wheeler
Ecopsychology is always attempting to understand phenomena as experiential, or rather through the phenomenological experience: that how we come to understand our world, ourselves, and each other is an embodied experience. Ecopsychology’s purpose is to extinguish the separation of self and nature and see it all as one whole process. So as a bodily sense of experience: what then is the unconscious?
It is the body’s stopped processes, a muscular and physiological blockage. It is a jam of our world-bound energies or intentions. We learn to deliberately intercept our bodily intentions (mainly through shame) until this becomes habitual: falling out of our explicit awareness. Thus the unconscious is born: our urges and desires (intentions) persisting in a cramped or dammed up form – as bodily blocked sexuality, anger, grief, fear, terror, love, joy, etc… Spoken in another way, if our body is a river then the water is our soul, and the movement of the water down river is the experience of life: our soul’s awakening and expressed self. If you place a dam along the river, stopping the flow, jamming the experiential process of your water, then we have what we call the unconscious.
The unconscious is not a separate mind within the mind. It is not this thing deep down inside of you with all the answers to the universe. It is not the “dam” itself, rather, it is a relational interactive phenomenon born from repression of your life process: not living fully. This is how pathology comes to exist. This is why the unconscious has become so common in psychology language to explain a part of ourselves.
#theunconscious #wetooarenature#ecopsychology

Identity, Contact, and the Self

Ecopsychology Project

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The self, our identity, can be lost more easily than we like to admit. If the self is known and realized through the cycle of full experiencing, then any interruption to this cycle causes a loss in identity. These interruptions can be found anywhere along the cycle of experience, and tend to occur in the realm of contact. "Hurtful contact are the zones in which we exist "outside" of our openly expressed needs or where we make life-forwarding contact with others. These zones are either "too close" (dangerous, invasive) or "too distant" (neglect, absent) in which our boundaries become either overwhelmed with direct intrusion or become unbearably tense through starvation. Or both. Much of our hurt occurs through social oppression. Children are particularly vulnerable to being hurt as they exist in a state of "all need", and too often parents use their children in a misguided attempt to gratify their own unmet, and so now "frozen," childhood needs." The plenitude ways in which our society violates our own relationship with self can all be understood as instances of naturism: the global mistreatment of nature by our society. To begin on a path towards a society married once again with nature, we must allow space for the self to heal, for your own nature to once again partake in the full experience of life. – – Where do you find such fullness in oneself? Please Share! (Excerpts from Andy Fisher's 'Radical Ecopsychology) #ecopsychology #rewild #hurtzone #selfinterruption #andyfisher

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The self, our identity, can be lost more easily than we like to admit. If the self is known and realized through the cycle of full experiencing, then any interruption to this cycle causes a loss in identity. These interruptions can be found anywhere along the cycle of experience, and tend to occur in the realm of contact. “Hurtful contact are the zones in which we exist “outside” of our openly expressed needs or where we make life-forwarding contact with others. These zones are either “too close” (dangerous, invasive) or “too distant” (neglect, absent) in which our boundaries become either overwhelmed with direct intrusion or become unbearably tense through starvation. Or both. Much of our hurt occurs through social oppression. Children are particularly vulnerable to being hurt as they exist in a state of “all need”, and too often parents use their children in a misguided attempt to gratify their own unmet, and so now “frozen,” childhood needs.” The plenitude ways in which our society violates our own relationship with self can all be understood as instances of naturism: the global mistreatment of nature by our society. To begin on a path towards a society married once again with nature, we must allow space for the self to heal, for your own nature to once again partake in the full experience of life. – – Where do you find such fullness in oneself? Please Share! (Excerpts from Andy Fisher’s ‘Radical Ecopsychology)#ecopsychology #rewild #hurtzone #selfinterruption #andyfisher

We Are Our Felt Experiencing

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Phenomenology "We are our felt experiencing.” ~ Gendlin Ecopsychology primarily deals in the realm of that osmotic membrane; the contact between the inner and the outer; The cycle in which exchange takes place. It is where dualism dissolves. It is the realm of experience in which we relax our boundaries just enough to let something new in. Final contact. Where our feelings, our bodily-felt ground of experience is satisfied. Where we surrender into an orgasm, give in to grief, gain a new skill, learn something, receive a message, or flow into an expressive movement. It is the place in our experience where we sink into the sounds of the river rushing below during a rest in the warm sun. Ecopsychology concerns itself with phenomenology with the understanding that the meaning of life is that it is to be lived. That we find meaning through our felt sense of the world around us, that the self is simply the experiential cycle in motion, that we are our felt experiencing. “What we implicitly feel at any given moment takes all of this into account, so that the need contained in our felt sense is the one that is most urgent or highest priority for coping with our environment carrying our lives forward at that point.” Begin to awaken to the messages your body is sharing. It is here you will find your deeper self and lost connection to the world at large. #ecopsychology #bodyawareness #somatics #phenomenology #healingtheself #theself

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Phenomenology “We are our felt experiencing.” ~ Gendlin

Ecopsychology primarily deals in the realm of that osmotic membrane; the contact between the inner and the outer; The cycle in which exchange takes place. It is where dualism dissolves. It is the realm of experience in which we relax our boundaries just enough to let something new in. Final contact. Where our feelings, our bodily-felt ground of experience is satisfied. Where we surrender into an orgasm, give in to grief, gain a new skill, learn something, receive a message, or flow into an expressive movement. It is the place in our experience where we sink into the sounds of the river rushing below during a rest in the warm sun. Ecopsychology concerns itself with phenomenology; with the understanding that the meaning of life is that it is to be lived. That we find meaning through our felt sense of the world around us, that the self is simply the experiential cycle in motion, that we are our felt experiencing. “What we implicitly feel at any given moment takes all of this into account, so that the need contained in our felt sense is the one that is most urgent or highest priority for coping with our environment carrying our lives forward at that point.” Begin to awaken to the messages your body is sharing. It is here you will find your deeper self and lost connection to the world at large.

The Bodily Ground of Experience

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The Bodily Ground of Experience: "only human beings have come to a point where they no longer know why they exist… they have forgotten the secret knowledge of their bodies, their senses, their dreams." ~ John (Fire) Lame Deer How do we come to extract meaning from our world? This question begs to be asked in a time when our purpose to be alive seems lost in the reflection of our own humanity. To return to the bodily ground of experience, to interpret the felt ground of the world with a privileged part of nature; our body, is to receive the intelligence of nature and the purpose of your life process. Somatics. The body is a finely ordered living responsiveness, always seeking some sort of symbolic completion for its needs or intentions. When we equate the body's needs with irrational tendencies, or sin, is to repress your own soul. It is to deanimate the self, as was systematically done by the time of the Age of Reason. Animality was considered then to be the root of madness; thereby returning to a state of chaos. But the irony is that if our nature is chaotic, then our experience has no intrinsic order. Yet all we must do is pick up the sand of a river bank and feel the weight of millions of parts slide through our fingers to understand that nature is the definition of order and organization. "Your body enacts your situations and constitutes them largely before you can think how. When your attention joins the living, you can pursue many more possibilities and choices than when you merely drive your body as if it were a machine like the car." ~ Eugene Gendlin #wetooarenature #ecopsychology #eugenegendlin #somatic #body #bodyintelligence #mindfullness #order #chaos

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The Totality of The Human Experience

Ecopsychology Project

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"In order to understand ourselves and heal ourselves in this age of abstract horror, we must regain the sense of the totality and the immediacy of human experience." ~ Stanley Diamond – Returning to experience is to awaken the senses. To be sensitive. In a world wrought with violence, we have dulled our senses as to distance and disconnect from the suffering of such consequences. Thus, a tree becomes an abstract thing, perceived objectively and separate from us even as we try to view it through a scientific, biological lens. To be sensitive is to find truth in your own experience. Find your senses, all the joy and sorrow, and feel the enrapture of the Cedar as she welcomes you back into her warm embrace. – #westernredcedar #wetooarenature #ecopsychology #sensitive #healingtrauma #stanelydiamond #phenomenology #experience #feminint #restore

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Ecopsychology Project
Ecopsychology Project

A Day in the Patient Life of Tyler

,philosophy, A Day in the Life Of, Running and mental health, Running in Circles
2016 was a year of me confronting what I want which ultimately brought me to the realization that I don’t really know what that is. And so with 2017 arriving I’m accepting that fact as gracefully as I know how, so I can take the next steps towards greater awareness, scraping off the layers of denying my own heart its true desires and begin exploring the world of risk-taking.
I’ve always wanted to rush life’s processes, anxious for change, but I always am expecting to be able to do it from the safety and comfort of my own conservatism. Committing to the unknown has always been a real issue for me, suspending me in what feels like a regressive time-wasting well with slippery moss-dampened high walls. I learned quickly in this deep well how to master self-deception, believing the walls can never be climbed, that I’ll just have to wait in the shuddering darkness for some savior to come rescue me in the forgotten forest. All of this, of course, I have done onto myself.
And so as the years go by, even as I live in the perceptive paradise of Hawai’i,  I have picked up the handy tool of doubting myself through the highly infectious inner spinning spools of the mind, twisting and weaving together threads of domesticated abstract thoughts, only mere reflections of who I am, into a too-tightly knit canvas, smothering the true me.  This blanket of deception- how I see myself, how my mind weaved together a construct of who I am – is now the wholly dominate way in which I have come to know myself. It’s hard to breath under that blanket. It’s hard to find any source of warmth in that well. It’s cold and lonely and I can only hear the echoes of my voice reverberating the doubts I shout so that my doubts in this illusionary well start shouting at themselves. Doubts shouting out doubts. Doubts doubting doubts.
Hawai’i in some ways has become a symbolic plane-field to contain my virtual self, and study it with keen awareness. Nothing really to report, certainly nothing worthy of being published. My life continues on what seems like a meaningless thread of nonsense. It brings me down a lot. I’m afraid I’ve learned to not trust most things, most people, weary of their true unconscious intentions, their unmet needs. But most of all, I have learned not to even trust myself. I’m not sure I have the strength to climb the walls towards the light. I’m not sure I have the the ability to relax so that the grip of my mind’s threads stops weaving its constricting tapestry around my squirming body.
I hunger for truth. I desire change. I pray for progress. I live in angst.
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On New Years Eve, I ventured out to the far reaching coast of Kalapana in Puna to stay with a fellow runner friend, Tyler. He’s 29, been on the island for 6 years and seems relatively grounded (relative to me that is). So I finally took him up on his invitation to dine and dash, in a literal sense. We went out for a 9 mile run on the Red Road, climbed his neighbors coconut tree to harvest the fruits as a favor, and settled into his abode as the sun set, shining its last colors above the jungle canopy.
Tyler bought a piece of land a few years back, and with the help of friend they built a 16×24 un-zoned house with lovely loft, complete with water catchment, a propane shower and composting toilet. Befriended his sweet elderly  neighbor with the mature coconuts, he borrows her electricity and modest wifi. We made a delicious abundance of vegan food all locally sourced (except for the rice). Because it was a special occasion, Tyler whipped out his valued juicer and creamed the old coconuts we harvested from the Tree, mixing it with a delectable tahini, lemon, curry spice, and soy sauce as dressing for the cooked Bananas, Uala Potatoes and Green Beans. On the ground of his kitchen lay a series of banana bunches on newspaper, all in what looked like a sequential order, from freshest to ripest. Tyler  was just going through his life’s routine, and I refreshingly observed the ins and outs of his low-impact, simple yet methodical Puna lifestyle.
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The Humble Abode

The next day we awoke to the new year, and amongst our breakfast we indulged in a digestive conversation about things to come. Tyler does not comment much on his introspective life, instead spending most of his cognitive abilities outwardly. His way of life is extremely systematic. He has only what he needs, and nothing more. He is efficient with his movements and his work. It is a delight to witness, and at times I found myself even humored by it as it creates a concentrative lightness in the atmosphere. I felt so far removed from my own internal burdens that being in his world with all of its intensive intentions somehow made me feel happy and giddy. As I laughed aloud a couple times, I hoped that Tyler did not take any offense. It was too tempting to express my jubilance as he performed calculating squats for optimal leverage while juicing the coconut, or his precise arm-wailing technique while entering his house through the screen door to prevent any greedy mosquitos from joining our New Years party. The beautiful part was that all his movements, his actions, were evolutionary-based. They were all created as solutions to problems. They were creative and effective. And if they weren’t effective, they died, and new methods were born. It is his way of life.

But in this morning-lit conversation, Tyler shared some wonderful insight that struck me like a big brass bell, still resonating through my trembling cells. “I feel there is a change coming soon for me. I’m not sure what it is, or when it will happen. There is a time for rest, and a time for action. The past six years I’ve not really had any motivation to pursue anything, so I didn’t force anything. I just lived day by day, exploring what I enjoyed, and throughout it all I’ve always been waiting with patience for when the time comes to move along. And I think it is soon.”

I looked up from my oats as he spoke. Just an hour before while Tyler was still asleep, my mind was active and buzzing, trying to figure out my life for me. I was looking at Job openings, I was looking at Graduate programs. I was considering this and pondering that. My mind is earnest, it is loyal and well-intentioned, but now, as Tyler finished speaking, I wondered just how much my mind was really acting in the best interest of the rest of me. For a split second I saw that the well wasn’t real. That the blanket was made of nothing. Here stood Tyler, a man who I can say without a doubt is a gifted and talented man, just living a self-proclaimed idle life in the back jungles of Puna, and he’s okay with that. Content with his life as it is, in the now.

I was inspired. Not by his life per se, but his attitude towards his life. His full trust and faith in himself. That what he’s doing now matters, and everything will fall into place as the tides change, as the seasons cycle, as the stars align.
I don’t know how many more cycles I have on this Island. I never really know. But I dream of living here forever. I dream of starting a family, having land, having purpose, having a close and loving everlasting community, where someday I’ll be a grandfather to the whole town. But I also still doubt too much that I’ll ever achieve that. I’m afraid I’ll be alone for the rest of my life. I’m afraid we all will be. That the world will end in loneliness.
Or revive itself in togetherness.
That day, as I collected my belongings and said my farewells to Tyler, I drove back along the windy roads to Hilo and started to reimagine myself as I once was, as I always have been: a man of faith exploring that which makes the heart grow fonder.
Here’s to 2017. A new year. Another year. Another chance to wash away the past and be alert to the callings of things to come. All we can do is prepare every day in every moment and act when it is time to act. If we miss the last bus, well then we’ll take the next train…
…as in the words of Julian Casablancas:
I say the right things but act the wrong way
I like it right here but I cannot stay
I watch the TV; forget what I’m told
Well, I am too young, and they are too old
Oh, man, can’t you see I’m nervous, so please
Pretend to be nice, so I can be mean
I miss the last bus, we take the next train
I try but you see, it’s hard to explain
,philosophy, Ecopsychology Project, Mythology